OPEN
CLOSE
15:00
24:30
¥470
Closed Wed.
OPEN
CLOSE
15:00
24:30
¥470
Closed Wed.
OPEN
CLOSE
15:00
24:30
¥470
Closed Wed.
JP

Historic sento founded 1914, rebuilt in 1930,

part of Takinogawa for more than 100 years

歴史

History

Inari-yu's history dates back more than 100 years. The first proprietor opened a public bath here in 1914 after apprenticing at Kame-no-yu in nearby Komagome. At the time, the surrounding area was rapidly urbanizing. The population of less than 10,000 people when Inari-yu was founded exploded to more than 100,000 a few years after the Great Kanto Earthquake of 1923. Inari-yu was rebuilt in 1930 by a team of temple carpenters. The name was taken from a small fox shrine that was established next door the year before.

Today, Inari-yu is beloved as one of Tokyo's last prewar public baths that still survives as part of an intact , small scale neighborhood. Appearances in the film Thermae Romae and other media have introduced Inari-yu to a wide audience as a symbol of sento culture.

建築

Architecture

In 2020, its 90th year since reconstruction, Inari-yu was registered as a National Tangible Cultural Property. The temple-like style of "miya-zukuri" architecture is emblematic of early 20th century Tokyo sento, and features an unusual three-layer roof over the entrance.

Many original elements, such as the high coffered cieling of the dressing room, gardens and ponds, and "bandai" entrance desk remain in their original form. The dressing rooms and entrance were expanded after the war, and the bathing area has since been updated. Outside the building, old wood, a table saw, pull cart, and other artifacts from the past are preserved and exhibited.

Explore
in VR!

VR Photography by Waka Kimizuka

浴室

Bathing area

Light spills from the windows near the ceiling of the bathing area onto the wall painting of Mt. Fuji. This artwork is frequently repainted and welcomes visitors to the sento.

Soak and relax in low, medium, and hot temperature baths. The cypress water buckets are a sento tradition kept alive at Inari-yu.

地域

Neighborhood

Inari-yu sites along the route of the old Nakasendo Road, where the village of Takinogawa was once known for its seed merchants. Farmers would purchase the next season's seeds here on the way home from the markets of Edo.

In the early 20th century, the fields filled with tightly-packed houses and a maze-like web of alleys emerged. Today Takinogawa is one of the few areas of central Tokyo that preserves this early 20th century atmosphere. Follow the Nakasendo to the northwest to find the old post town of Itabashi, and southeast to the popular Jizo-dori in Sugamo. Or wander down to the Shakujii River, once the engine of the area's industrialization, as it flows toward Oji.

History

歴史

Inari-yu's history dates back more than 100 years. The first proprietor opened a public bath here in 1914 after apprenticing at Kame-no-yu in nearby Komagome. At the time, the surrounding area was rapidly urbanizing. The population of less than 10,000 people when Inari-yu was founded exploded to more than 100,000 a few years after the Great Kanto Earthquake of 1923. Inari-yu was rebuilt in 1930 by a team of temple carpenters. The name was taken from a small fox shrine that was established next door the year before.

Today, Inari-yu is beloved as one of Tokyo's last prewar public baths that still survives as part of an intact, small scale neighborhood. Appearances in the film Thermae Romae and other media have introduced Inari-yu to a wide audience as a symbol of sento culture.

Architecture

建築

In 2020, its 90th year since reconstruction, Inari-yu was registered as a National Tangible Cultural Property. The temple-like style of "miya-zukuri" architecture is emblematic of early 20th century Tokyo sento, and features an unusual three-layer roof over the entrance.

Many original elements, such as the high coffered ceiling of the dressing room, gardens and ponds, and "bandai" entrance desk remain in their original form. The dressing rooms and entrance were expanded after the war, and the bathing area has since been updated. Outside the building, old wood, a table saw, pull cart, and other artifacts from the past are preserved and exhibited.

Explore
in VR!

VR Photography by Waka Kimizuka

Bathing area

浴室

Inside the bathing area, light spills from the high windows onto a vivid wall painting of Mt. Fuji, a traditional symbol of Tokyo-area bathhouses.

Soak and relax in low, medium, and hot temperature baths. The cypress water buckets are a sento tradition kept alive at Inari-yu.

Neighborhood

地域

Inari-yu sites along the route of the old Nakasendo Road, where the village of Takinogawa was once known for its seed merchants. Farmers would purchase the next season's seeds here on the way home from the markets of Edo.

In the early 20th century, the fields filled with tightly-packed houses and a maze-like web of alleys emerged. Today Takinogawa is one of the few areas of central Tokyo that preserves this early 20th century atmosphere. Follow the Nakasendo to the northwest to find the old post town of Itabashi, and southeast to the popular Jizo-dori in Sugamo. Or wander down to the Shakujii River, once the engine of the area's industrialization, as it flows toward Oji.

Nagaya

長屋

Opening 2022!

Alongside Inari-yu stands a two-room nagaya building that once housed employees of the sento. Originally built along the Nakasendo Road after the Great Kanto Earthquake, it was moved to the current location and attached to Inari-yu. For years, it has sat empty and abandoned.

In every era, sento have served as places for people to interact and enjoy the company of others. The public baths of Edo are said to have had comfortable spaces on the second floor where customers played chess, drank tea, and chatted with one another.

Today, in many neighborhoods near baths, people still enjoy "kakuuchi" culture of stopping by a liquor shop after a bath to drink a can of beer and have snacks with the regulars. Public baths have a special ability, and perhaps a duty, to nurture warm connections that flow into the surrounding neighborhood.

We plan to restore and transform this century-old building into a new community space befitting of a 21st century sento. Work is already underway thanks to generous support received from World Monuments Fund and American Express.

Together with the community, we look forward to turning this space into a place that creates new connections between sento and neighborhood—a place where you might talk with neighbors, sit on the tatami and read about the history of sento, enjoy a one-day cafe run by a community member, or even eat breakfast after a morning bath.

稲荷湯長屋
INARIyu Nagaya


Alongside Inari-yu stands a two-room nagaya building that once housed employees of the sento. Originally built along the Nakasendo Road after the Great Kanto Earthquake, it was moved to the current location and attached to Inari-yu. For years, it has sat empty and abandoned.

In every era, sento have served as places for people to interact and enjoy the company of others. The public baths of Edo are said to have had comfortable spaces on the second floor where customers played chess, drank tea, and chatted with one another.
Today, in many neighborhoods near baths, people still enjoy "kakuuchi" culture of stopping by a liquor shop after a bath to drink a can of beer and have snacks with the regulars. Public baths have a special ability, and perhaps a duty, to nurture warm connections that flow into the surrounding neighborhood.

We plan to restore and transform this century-old building into a new community space befitting of a 21st century sento. Work is already underway thanks to generous support received from World Monuments Fund and American Express.

Together with the community, we look forward to turning this space into a place that creates new connections between sento and neighborhood—a place where you might talk with neighbors, sit on the tatami and read about the history of sento, enjoy a one-day cafe run by a community member, or even eat breakfast after a morning bath.






旧中山道
国道17号‧
都営三田線


Old Nakasendo Highway
Nishi-
Sugamo
Station
Route 17 /
Toei Mita Line
Meiji
Boulevard
JR
Saikyo
Line
西巣鴨駅
Itabashi
Station
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